George Clooney W Magazine Art Issue Cover 2

Seeing Spots: George Clooney Gets Kusama’d for W Magazine’s Art Issue

George Clooney Covers W Magazine Art Issue

George Clooney Covers W Magazine Art Issue

George Clooney covers W Magazine‘s annual Art Issue (December/January) in a look that has Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama written all over it!

“[Kusama] depicted me covered in polka dots. She made me Snoopy! But I must say: I’m proud to be Snoopy!”

His spread also features Clooney-inspired works by four other female artists Karen Kilimnik, Marilyn Minter, Catherine Opie, and Tracey Emin.

Photographed by Emma Summerton, the actor wears selections from Giorgio Armani chosen by stylist Michael Kucmeroski.

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

George Clooney wearing Giorgio Armani suit, shirt, and shoes customized by Yayoi Kusama for W Magazine December/January

Check out snippets from his interview where he speaks on his upcoming film The Monuments Men, Hitler’s art collection and his cinematic crush:

“[Hitler] wanted to build a Führer Museum. He had a model of it in the bunker with him! He wanted to steal all the great art in the world, and he was well on his way—during the war, he collected 5 million pieces. He also destroyed works he termed “degenerate art.” The Nazis took amazing Picassos and Klees and Mirós and burned them in the garden outside the Jeu de Paume museum in Paris. They wanted to prove that they were illegitimate and had to be destroyed. Hitler pulled off the greatest art heist in the history of the world—luckily, some of that art has been recovered.

He was a failed artist in Vienna. In the film, we show a couple of his ­watercolors. If he had only been a little bit better at painting, history might be different.

He loved da Vinci! Starting in the late 1930s, he sent professors to the greatest museums in the world to have “meetings,” but they were secretly making lists of all the paintings and their locations for Hitler. When the Nazis conquered a country, he would take the art.”