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NYC // Harlem’s First Black Comic Book Festival @ The Schomburg | Jan. 12

On January 12th, Harlem’s Schomburg Center For Research in Black Culture will hold the historic neighborhood’s first Black Comic Book Festival. The full day of activities includes a film screening of ‘White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in Comic Books,’ a pop-up art exhibition in honor of legendary comic book artist Jack Kirby, discussions, workshops and more!

White Scripts and Black Supermen - Black Masculinities in Comic Books
‘White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in Comic Books’ by Johnathan Gayles, PhD

On January 12th, Harlem’s Schomburg Center For Research in Black Culture will hold the historic neighborhood’s first Black Comic Book Festival, presented by the Schomburg Junior Scholars and Jonathan Gayles, PhD (Georgia State University).

The dynamic event celebrates the rich tradition of black superheroes, where attendees of all ages will enjoy a day full of activities, including a film screening of Gayles‘ White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in Comic Books, which looks at early hyper-masculinity of Black men in comics.

A pop-up art exhibition, Black Kirby, will pay visual homage to legendary comic book artist Jack Kirby whose work consists of Captain America, Fantastic Four, Hulk, and the first known Black superhero — Black Panther.

There will also be panel discussions, hands-on workshops, and exhibit tables with premiere black comic book artists from across the country.

When

Saturday, January 12, 2013
10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Where

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard
New York, NY 10037-1801
(212) 491-2200

Cost

FREE

RSVP

Registration is required via email: schomburged@nypl.org. Learn more here.

Watch: White Scripts and Black Supermen Trailer

Through interviews with prominent artists, scholars and cultural critics along with images from the comic books themselves, this film examines the degree to which early Black superheroes generally adhered to common stereotypes about Black men. From the humorous, to the offensive, early Black superheroes are critically considered.

spotted via bleedingcool.com

By theComplex

theComplex is Sinuous Magazine's vibrant Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director. With 17 years of design and online writing experience, she has shaped Sinuous with her passions for the arts, design, music, food, and issues impacting marginalized communities. She greatly enjoys researching topics of interest, the art of foul language, voicing a thoughtful opinion, and incessant day-dreaming.